Archive for the ‘Environment’ Category

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Important Voices: JohnsonForAmerica.com interviews Kristofer Lorelli, publisher of RightOSphere.com

In 2010 elections,Barack Obama,Drug reform,Economy,Environment,Foreign policy,Gary Johnson,GOP,Government spending,Immigration,Judiciary,Taxes,Tea Party,Term Limits on April 26, 2010 by Josiah Schmidt

This is interview #31 in JohnsonForAmerica.com’s “Important Voices” series, where we talk with key figures, such as elected officials, candidates, authors, commentators, and policy experts, about the issues of the day.  A new interview is released every Monday, so check back often!

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Our guest for today’s Important Voices interview is Kristofer Lorelli.  Kristofer is an American former political organizer and fundraiser, residing in suburban Toronto, Ontario. He is a self-described ‘Goldwater Conservative’.  Kristofer is the publisher and business affairs manager of the conservative news and opinion website, RightOSphere.com.  In that capacity, Kristofer has been a courageous and leading voice persuading conservatives to call for an end to the failed drug prohibition.

Josiah Schmidt: What is the best part of being the co-Publisher of Rightosphere?

Kristofer Lorelli: It allows me to interact with and learn from the grassroots, which is significantly more desirable than speaking to political insiders and members of the media.  I view it as a privilege that the Rightosphere platform allows me to communicate with interesting people from across the United States and the world, as they provide me with far superior insight to current affairs compared to what I absorb from mainstream periodicals and the talking heads on cable news. 

On a selfish note, it has allowed me to make better use of my 25+ hours of weekly reading and an opportunity to work closely with my good friend Kavon W. Nikrad and our Editorial staff, who’s coattails I plan on riding for many, many years.

I am very satisfied that finally we all have a fully dedicated networking site for conservatives!

Josiah Schmidt: How did you become a conservative, and what does conservatism mean to you?

Kristofer Lorelli: I was influenced the most by my 94 year old Grandfather, who for as long as I can remember has displayed color photographs of Ronald Reagan at his home in Hackettstown, New Jersey.  I was very lucky that he retired early and spent many summers with us, protecting me from my liberal friends, liberal teachers and the liberal media. 

Most conservatives of my age group (I’m about to turn 33) were heavily influenced by the reform movement in the early 1990′s.  The early success of the Contract with America and the wave of Governors elected to office (Engler, Thompson, Johnson, etc.) created a new generation of conservatives, which sustained the GOP majority for over a decade, until our leadership lost its way.

I am very interested in learning about the next generation, which is one of the reasons why I have your web site and Facebook page bookmarked.  I am fascinated and encouraged with how young libertarian-leaning Republicans are engaged in the political process and leading the path to change in our party and political system.        

As for what conservatism means to me?  I’ll let a former conservative leader http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GITwqqE72N8 and a future http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94lW6Y4tBXs conservative leader speak on my behalf.
 
Josiah Schmidt: Do you think there is a place in the GOP for small-l libertarians?

Kristofer Lorelli: I most certainly do.  I know the term “conservative fusion” is very much overused, but it is the most accurate way to describe the modern conservative movement in America.  When libertarians and social conservatives (and everyone in-between) compromise and unite, the American conservative movement is unstoppable. Unfortunately for the last several years, one wing believed it could go it alone without the other.  I believe this attitude has changed.  

I describe myself as a minarchist, which is about as close as one came come to being a small-l libertarian, while maintaining many modern conservative foreign and economic policy positions, and I can tell you that not unlike the feelings that have been expressed by many of your members, it has been a long and lonely last 10 years in the political wilderness.  Finally, we have been welcomed back (or forced ourselves back) inside the jalopy.  

Josiah Schmidt: What is the significance of the burgeoning Tea Party movement, in your view?

Kristofer Lorelli: The Tea Party movement is having little effect on the progressive movement and its leaders, who truly view the Tea Party movement as a fad.  They make this assumption at their own peril. 

The real value of the Tea Party movement, is that it is positively influencing the Republican agenda and its leaders.  To the core, most Republican politicians are not Tea Partiers themselves (yet), but most have been awoken to the power of this grassroots operation.      

I believe we have yet to experience the full impact of the movement. 

Josiah Schmidt: Do you think the tide is finally turning against the Drug Prohibition within the Republican Party?

Kristofer Lorelli: I do in the case of soft drugs.  Our overall approach to the drug war policy of the last 40 years and the failure of our governments and non-profits to focus on prevention.  I recognize that generation ‘Y’ and generation ‘X’ have a significantly different opinion on this matter than their parents’ and grandparents ‘ generation, but I believe the movement from prohibition we are seeing in polling on this issue is coming from young parents.   

President Reagan said; “All great change in America begins at the dinner table”, which is true in this case.  Parents do not want their children to face an uncertain future, because they were convicted of smoking pot or experimenting with ecstasy at a young age.  I do not believe the majority of Republicans are ready to adopt the legalization policies found in The Netherlands, but they are ready to look at alternative solutions to the existing possession laws and how our government allocates resources to the drug consumption and trafficking issues.   

This is one example of where libertarians and social conservatives need to seek compromise and meet in the middle of the issue.  

Josiah Schmidt: What is the most important lesson conservatives ought to take away from George W. Bush’s presidency?

Kristofer Lorelli: It is difficult for me to be critical of President G.W. Bush’s presidency, as he served two full terms, which is usually the high level gauge for a President’s political success.  All I will say is that the American people are desperate for a President that will not walk lock-step with Congress.  President Bush failed to hold the Republican Congress accountable on corruption and spending, which resulted in the Republican defeats of 2006 and 2008, a mistake which is being repeated by President Obama and his Democratic controlled upper and lower Houses. 

I supported President Bush’s decision to increase funding of our military, reforming our immigration laws, cutting taxes and appointing Judges that strictly interpreted our constitution.       

Josiah Schmidt: What do you think will be the biggest issue in the 2012 presidential election?

Kristofer Lorelli: Domestically, I expect unemployment to remain above 6% and underemployment to remain above 10%.  A simple and pragmatic (and easily repeatable) platform that focuses on growing employment through the private sector is what will probably resonate most effectively with voters in 2012. 

In addition, I believe a majority of voters will be frustrated by the size of our federal government and many of the intrusive laws that the liberal administration and Congress are planning on passing in 2010.

Internationally, I believe Iraq could possibly reemerge as a critical issue.  The most under-reported story so far in 2010 are the set-backs that are being experienced in Iraq.  The Bush plan (adopted by Obama) may still yet succeed, but if it does not, similar to the financial meltdown of late 2008, Iraq could be the unexpected issue that turns the tide in the next campaign for President.  Although I believe we have a strategic and moral obligation to stabilize Iraq, I am not sure if the American public will be in support of a troop build-up in 2011/2012, so the prospective candidates better be prepared with well rehearsed talking points and a clear strategy.

Josiah Schmidt: Assuming Governor Gary Johnson is running for President in 2012, what advice would you give him if you could?

Kristofer Lorelli: He should not allow the establishment media to portray him as the ‘pro-drug’ candidate.  Although I believe it can be a winning issue in 2012, it is not one that has been embraced by a Republican leader who had or has White House aspirations (although I know of one that quietly supports Governor Johnson’s platform).  As I believe the Governor will be breaking ground on this policy position, he cannot allow it to be a dominant theme.

It is important that his campaign (and his supporters in the Rightosphere) educate voters on his many successes as Governor of New Mexico.  Governor Johnson’s first term in office was probably the most successful results-oriented term of any United States Governor in the last 25 years.  Many of the common-sense budgetary and legislative initiatives enacted by Governor Johnson are the same solutions that are currently viewed by American voters (citing 2010 polls) as most favored to help our country overcome the existing economic, corruption and bureaucratic challenges.   

The words and phrases that should be plastered on his campaign manager’s wall, are; ‘New Hampshire’, ‘Osama bin Laden’, ‘employment’, ‘clean water’, ‘independent female voters’, ‘Romneycare’, ‘nanny state’, ‘balanced budget’, ‘term limits’, ‘over-taxation’ and ‘small business owners’. 

Josiah Schmidt: Anything else you’d like to say our readers?
 
Kristofer Lorelli: I would like to thank you for our friendship and for the efforts of your members to change our political system and for being an example on how conservatives must communicate, network and mobilize in the 21st century. 

I would like to encourage each one of them to remain politically active, but to be wary of any politician that has a desire to remain in Washington for longer then two terms.  The political proletariat is infected by swine and our only hope of changing the system is through a grassroots intervention in November of 2010 and November of 2012.  True conservatives do not view the establishment as an abode to life, but instead as an institution to constantly question.  Your members have chosen wisely, as Governor Johnson is one of our conservative leaders that is looking to vicissitate the establishment, not exist within in.    

The Republican hierarchy is losing it’s stranglehold on the party to the grassroots, which is led by libertarians, conservative independents and right of center reformers who are not connected to the establishment. Although it is a diverse group, this conservative reformers coalition must not let up until it has won this battle.  Even though lobbyists, career pols and the power-addicted insiders are trying to discourage these efforts, discredit its leaders and infiltrate its trickle up infrastructure, we must recognized that this is a historic opportunity to regain control over the conservative movement and the Republican party.

Fight on within the movement and the party, my brothers and sisters.

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Gary Johnson on MoneyDots Radio with Barbara Alexander

In Deficit,Drug reform,Economy,Energy,Entitlements,Environment,Foreign policy,Gary Johnson,Gary Johnson 2012,Government spending,Health care,Inflation,Interviews,Our America,Taxes,Term Limits on April 17, 2010 by Josiah Schmidt

Gary Johnson speaks with Barbara Alexander on MoneyDots Radio regarding such issues as the economy, government spending, deficits, entitlements, inflation, taxes, term limits, drug law reform, cap-and-trade, health care, foreign policy, the 2012 presidential election, and his Our America Initiative.

Listen In

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FTR Radio Interviews Gary Johnson

In Drug reform,Economy,Energy,Entitlements,Environment,Foreign policy,Government spending,Health care,Immigration,Interviews,Taxes,Term Limits on April 14, 2010 by Josiah Schmidt

Gary Johnson talks to FTR Radio at the Southern Republican Leadership Conference regarding his gubernatorial experience, term limits, the economy, government spending, deficits, entitlements, taxes, immigration, drug law reform, health care, foreign policy, the environment, energy, and Gary’s half-completed goal to climb the highest mountain on every continent.

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Part 3

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Important Voices: JohnsonForAmerica.com interviews Floy Lilley, libertarian audio book narrator

In Economy,Environment,Federal Reserve,Foreign policy,GOP,Important Voices,Interviews,Ron Paul,Tea Party on April 5, 2010 by Josiah Schmidt

This is interview #25 in JohnsonForAmerica.com’s “Important Voices” series, where we talk with key figures, such as elected officials, candidates, authors, commentators, and policy experts, about the issues of the day.  A new interview is released every Monday and every Thursday, so check back often!

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Our guest for today’s Important Voices interview is Floy Lilley.  Floy is a libertarian writer, audio book narrator, entrepreneur, and a veteran of UN Climate Change conferences (more than twenty, in fact).  Floy lives in Auburn, Alabama (where she works with the Ludwig von Mises Institute) and often contributes to Mises.org and LewRockwell.com.

Josiah Schmidt: How did you come to hold such a liberty-oriented philosophy?

Floy Lilley: I had a strong work ethic at home with parents and family that read and gave me an environment of self-worth and responsibility, even though my Dad was a career Navy officer. He did, after retirement, feel that his state life had been one of deceit.  I held my first good private sector job at thirteen and have worked ever since. When I first read Atlas Shrugged at seventeen I owned it in every way. Thereafter I called my philosophical bent Objectivism, but was not a Randian. A small group of us studied every newsletter that Rand published and I read everything she wrote.

I met F.A. Hayek in 1973 and read his work. I devoured Reed’s FEE publications. I contributed heavily to the successful creation and growth of both new and established private businesses. I was part of the entrepreneurial force. I met Ron Paul, Lew Rockwell, Murray Rothbard, Walter Block, and Burt Blumert in the eighties and began reading their work. In law, my interest was on property rights. Bastiat’s book was a favorite. For a privately-funded university Chair of Free Enterprise, I delivered speeches nationally on the piecemeal plunder of private property rights that I witnessed. I worked to pass Private Property Acts in the separate states. I have been a watchdog to the actions of the United Nations that seek the establishment of global government and the destruction of private property, individual sovereignty, natural law, individual rights, sound money and all wealth-creating elements of free societies. Hans-Hermann Hoppe’s work in the nineties shifted me solidly into anarcho-capitalist ranks.

Today, the work I do is the work I have loved my whole life – spreading the remarkable ideas of liberty in all possible formats. Ideas do have consequences. Marx and Keynes have ruled way too many generations.
 
Josiah Schmidt: What are your top three favorite books?

Floy Lilley: Atlas Shrugged (1957) by Ayn Rand, The Law (1850) by Frederic Bastiat, and Democracy: The God That Failed (2001) by Hans-Hermann Hoppe.

Josiah Schmidt: Who do you think is the most underrated and underestimated libertarian writer of all time?

Floy Lilley: Algernon Sidney. He is so underrated and underestimated that he is virtually unknown. He wrote Discourses Concerning Government. The Crown killed him in 1683. Along with John Locke and Trenchard and Gordon of Cato’s Letters, Sidney was, according to Murray N. Rothbard, one of the three most cited and quoted theorists developing libertarian thought in America. Sidney stresses the right of revolution.

“To Sidney, revolution and freedom were closely linked. Whenever people’s liberties were threatened or invaded, they had the right, nay the duty, to rebel. Everyone might legitimately slay a tyrant, and there is much justification for defending the rights of individuals against tyranny.” p.188 Conceived in Liberty, Vol II.

Sidney’s analysis of individual reason influenced Anne Hutchinson’s lone pioneering in philosophical anarchism.

Josiah Schmidt: What do you think is the significance of the burgeoning “Tea Party” movement?

Floy Lilley: I share Laurence Vance’s assessment that Tea Party people are sincere and teachable, while still not being reliable and consistent advocates of liberty.

Were the movement to galvanize, it would probably supplant the Republican Party, as Gerald Celente has predicted it will in 2012. That would be good for liberty if it were to be a substantive change rather than simply a switch in the faces of the ruling class.

Josiah Schmidt: In your opinion, what is the biggest, looming, unseen threat to our freedom today?

Floy Lilley: The state itself is the grand seen threat to our freedom. Within that public monster grows the threat that works diligently to remain off radar – the monopoly cartel which is our monetary system.

Since there is no political freedom possible until there is first economic freedom, the monopoly cartel that seized our money, banking and credit system in 1913 remains the chief obstacle to individual liberty and to a free society in our country.

To expose this core threat is pure radicalism. Few groups outside the Austrian economists and Ron Paulians have gained the knowledge and have had the courage to consistently work at informing others about the enslaving role of the Federal Reserve as our central bank. It is past time to separate money and the state.

Josiah Schmidt: How did Ron Paul’s 2008 campaign change America?

Floy Lilley: For the first time in eighty-five years the existence and authority of the central bank is questioned. Paul’s campaign has contained substance that has always been considered the third rail of politics. His courageous convictions alone earn respect and allegiance. But, as vibrant as Paul’s message is, it is the technological medium’s response to that message that has changed American politics. Grassroots have become grass digits. Decentralized internet communication has dented the highly controlled mass media messages. Hierarchies quake.

Josiah Schmidt: In a few sentences, how might the free market handle anthropogenic global warming (assuming it’s true, just for the sake of argument) better than the State?

Floy Lilley: Nature’s Law is mutate, migrate, adapt, or die. Adaption, innovation and resilience are natural characteristics of free societies, not states. Whatever the crisis might be, the flexible and innovative responses of entrepreneurs will always beat the bureauclerosis of a state. The only free society on the planet today is the internet. Earthweb by Marc Stiegler (1999 – Baen) is the way the free market handles catastrophic events. I think it is our future networked intelligence. But then, I never do see people as bellies, but as minds.

Josiah Schmidt: Who do you think was the most competent (or should I say, the least incompetent) United States President in our nation’s history?

Floy Lilley: Harding. Jim Powell’s article on him makes a full case. Less government in business and a non-interventionist foreign policy endear his actions to me. Harding recognized the crucial importance of encouraging investment essential for growth and jobs. ‘We need vastly more freedom than we do regulation,’ he said.

Josiah Schmidt: What advice would you give to libertarians reading this interview?

Floy Lilley: Those of us who love and live liberty do not have plans for others lives. We want others to keep their hands out of our pockets and to mind their own business.

Political movements require leaders and youth. It is always a delicate act to lead without controlling. There was a stretch of time when President Paul seemed a possibility. Burt Blumert was the first to remind us that were Paul elected, we would have to get busy with impeachment proceedings, it being impossible for any human to resist such seduction of the power in being the Chief Executive.

Josiah Schmidt: Anything else you’d like to say to our readers?

Floy Lilley: Did you know that in England libertarians were first known as Levellers?  Or, that a general Hudson River uprising was the Levellers’ Uprising of 1766? Because I voice recorded all four volumes of it, I am here to tell you that Conceived In Liberty by Murray N. Rothbard is the most amazing libertarian historical effort in which a libertarian lens is held up to colonial America. Rothbard clearly saw the play between social forces and state forces during our Nation’s formation. You can download the PDFs freely, or the MP3 audios freely from our open site Mises.org. No permissions needed to reprint or copy. Now that’s the libertarian way.

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Gary Johnson: Continue the Fight for Liberty

In 2010 elections,Deficit,Economy,Energy,Environment,Gary Johnson,Government spending,Health care,Our America on March 23, 2010 by Josiah Schmidt

From Gary Johnson’s blog on OurAmericaInitiative.com today:

It is tempting to lose heart after seeing Washington rack up a trillion dollars more in debt this weekend, while claiming that its new health care bill will actually save America money in the long run. It is especially discouraging to see Congress using back-room deals and arm-twisting to pass a bill that a majority of Americans didn’t even want. This is not how our government should work.

But don’t lose heart or feel like the fight is over. In truth, it has only just begun. Continue to put pressure on your elected representatives and let them know how you feel about this legislation. Continue to share a message and vision of health care freedom with the people you know. Continue to support candidates that you believe will respect the will of the American people, work for the general welfare instead of special interests, and follow the dictates of the Constitution. Let us not forget that there is a very important election this year and we all need to participate at let our voices be heard.

There are many alternative solutions to fix America’s problems, especially with its broken health care industry, and it’s never too late to draw attention to these solutions and pressure Congress to enact them. To give just one example: health insurance companies seem to have so much power over their customers because if the customers don’t like the prices or quality of their coverage, they are usually not free to buy competing health insurance from outside their state.

By simply requiring states to end their blockade of health insurance coverage across state lines- a Constitutional solution, provided for in the Commerce Clause of Article I- we would free Americans to buy a plan that works for them, instead of just one that is compliant with their state’s endless mandates and regulations. Insurance companies could no longer hide behind state lines from competition. If an insurer charged too much or had a reputation for bullying customers at their time of most desperate need, its customers would have other options.

It is amazing that easy, non-partisan, common-sense solutions like this have received very little attention at all, getting drowned out by partisan controversy over legislation of dubious benefit to our country. But if people like you and me keep on spreading the word about solutions like these (by e-mailing this article to a couple friends, for instance), we can build momentum toward true reform in our nation’s capitol.

Also brace yourself for other partisan, special interest bills. After getting what it wanted over the protests of the American public, Congress will now be emboldened to move forward on economically devastating cap-and-trade legislation and other so-called reforms that will only destroy more American wealth and assume more unconstitutional powers for an already out-of-control government in Washington. Please stay in touch with us here at Our America Initiative, by becoming a fan of our Facebook page and following us on Twitter. We will continue to keep you up-to-date as the battle for our freedom continues.

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Important Voices: JohnsonForAmerica.com interviews Linda Goldthorpe, candidate for US Congress, Michigan-1

In 2010 elections,Civil liberties,Economy,Environment,Foreign policy,GOP,Government spending,Health care,Important Voices,Interviews on March 1, 2010 by Josiah Schmidt

This is interview #15 in JohnsonForAmerica.com’s “Important Voices” series, where we talk with key figures, such as elected officials, candidates, authors, commentators, and policy experts, about the issues of the day.  A new interview is released every Monday and every Thursday, so check back often!

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Our guest for today’s Important Voices interview is Linda Goldthorpe.   Linda is a graduate of Northern Michigan University and Thomas Cooley Law School.  She is a pro bono attorney, who says she quit practicing law for money because she couldn’t offer people any assurance they’d obtain justice.  Watching Congress brought her to the same conclusion, so she is now running as a Republican for a seat in the US Congress from Michigan’s first district.  Linda lives with her husband and two sons on the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

Josiah Schmidt: What compelled you to enter elective politics?

Linda Goldthorpe: As a politically motivated attorney, I saw little result for my efforts.  Government was destroying lives and I couldn’t stop it.

Josiah Schmidt: What issues are most important to residents of Michigan?

Linda Goldthorpe: Economy.  Michigan is devastated.  In the far north, where I live, we’ve always seen our brightest and best leave after every graduation, for jobs far away.  Now the whole state is affected the same way.

Josiah Schmidt: What do you offer that your opponents do not?

Linda Goldthorpe: Fire.

Josiah Schmidt: How did you come to hold such a liberty-oriented philosophy?

Linda Goldthorpe: I fell in love with the Constitution in law school, where they taught us it really didn’t matter.  Rutherford Institute.  Civil rights. Freedom.

Josiah Schmidt: What is the first thing you will do as a US Congresswoman?

Linda Goldthorpe: I heard an incumbent answer this question once:  “I will make relationships with other like-minded…blah…”   I’m tired of the “I scratch your back, you scratch mine” politics.  I’m not sure what I’ll do first, but I won’t be making friends.

Josiah Schmidt: Which area of government spending would you most like to cut?

Linda Goldthorpe: 700 military bases in countries that don’t want us is a start.  Agencies are ridiculous.  Now we have one to control the climate?

Josiah Schmidt: How should health care be reformed?

Linda Goldthorpe: I believe in the free market.  Government intervention is always a bad thing.  I would say (cautiously) that regulation, even in the area of health care, minimizes our choices obviously, but also quality and availability.

Josiah Schmidt: What changes would you like to see in our government’s foreign policy?

Linda Goldthorpe: To say that we’re more safe by bombing other countries, while ignoring our own border, is disingenuous and dangerous.  I believe, as our founding fathers did, in a non-interventionist foreign policy.  It’s arrogant to try to force our values on anybody else.

Josiah Schmidt: Where can people go to find out more about you and contribute to your campaign?

Linda Goldthorpe: lindaforcongress.com 

Josiah Schmidt: Thanks.  We wish you all the best, Linda.

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Gary Johnson: Energy Entrepreneurship is the Solution to America’s Clean Energy Needs

In Economy,Energy,Environment,Gary Johnson,Government spending,Our America,Press Release,Taxes on February 23, 2010 by Josiah Schmidt

From Gary Johnson’s OurAmericaInitiative.com website today:

One important question for our era is: How do we create clean, affordable, renewable energy? It would seem that Silicon Valley engineer, K.R. Sridhar has found an answer to that question, the Bloom Box. With its dazzling premiere on 60 minutes Sunday evening, the Bloom Box is making a big splash on the Internet as the next best solution to our energy needs. It’s a small fuel cell that produces a lot of energy, allowing its users to unplug from the power grid and cheaply generate energy themselves.

CBS News reports that it has already been quietly purchased and tested by several companies in California, including Google, FedEx, and eBay- which claims to have saved $100,000 in energy costs in just a few months after powering 15% of their main campus’ energy needs with the Bloom Box. Whether the Bloom Box lives up to the hype or not, one thing remains clear: that private entrepreneurship will solve our energy problems and keep our land, air, and water clean. Small business, not big government, is the solution.

Directives from a climate conference in Copenhagen may have an only marginal impact on global CO2 emissions (especially if some developing countries don’t comply), but they would have a tremendous impact on the daily lives of people like you and me. By raising the costs of energy as much as 25% cap and trade schemes would cripple the American economy and break the budgets of families that are already struggling to make ends meet. What do we say to the poor elderly couple in Iowa who would have to choose between food and heat during a deadly cold winter?

Innovators like K.R. Sridhar and his company, Bloom Energy, offer a better alternative. Instead of limiting our environmental impact in a way that hurts the finances of American households and businesses, energy entrepreneurs seek to limit our environmental impact by creating value for Americans. The beauty of energy efficiency is that it needs no directive from a government central planner, because energy efficiency is cost efficiency, and Americans already have an incentive to cut costs. In the end, it will be people like you and me who want to save money in our homes and small businesses that will drive a true and lasting revolution in energy efficiency and sustainability.

The best thing the government can do to ensure this happens, is to not stand in its way. Lower taxes, less spending, fewer strangling regulations, an end to all the credit-hogging by the US Treasury, and other business-friendly policies will make sure the American economy is strong and awash with the capital and credit it needs to fuel entrepreneurship, while breaking down the barriers that keep new entrepreneurs from getting off the ground.

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